Uzodimma raises workers’ minimum wage to N40, 000, rolls out multiple palliatives for citizens

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Hope Uzodinma

Governor Hope Uzodimma of Imo State at the weekend rose to the challenge of hardship recently made worse by the removal of fuel subsidy in the country, raising the minimum wage of workers in Imo State to N40, 000 and rolling out multiple palliatives that will go a long way in alleviating the sufferings of the citizens.

The multiple palliatives include enhanced free transportation, feeding and medical care for workers, generous loans to genuine farmers, establishment of marketing and commodity boards, payment of gratuities to retirees, mass housing, recruitment of more teachers for primary, secondary and tertiary institutions, bursary and scholarship for Imo State students, among others.

Governor Uzodimma unveiled the package at a special meeting of critical stakeholders comprising religious leaders, politicians, farmers, traders, labour leaders, among others, which he convened at the Rockview Hotel, Owerri.

The Governor said he had watched with keen interest how the people had been faring since the removal of the subsidy on fuel was announced, noting,  “I can tell you that I have been deeply worried by my observations.”

He said, “It is clear to me that our people are suffering, particularly the low-income earners and those in paid employment. I have therefore convened this special meeting with the leadership of Organised Labour, Traders, Farmers and Artisans, to announce the comprehensive palliative measures we are putting in place, which I am sure will ease these sufferings, in addition to the measures expected from the Federal Government. I want you to know that I am with you in your travails. I share your worries.”

The Governor added that the plans he was unveiling “are aimed at making life more meaningful for ordinary people in the face of the current economic challenges aggravated by not only the removal of subsidies on petroleum products but also the effect of global economic challenges.

“Let me say, however, that although the impact of that policy appears harsh in the short-run, it will, in the long run, bring positive results,” he added.